News B&B

Published on April 14th, 2015 | by Dean Carr

Comments

Selling alcohol in a B&B

From time to time we get asked to give advice on selling alcohol at a guest house or bed & breakfast. There are literally thousands of B&B’s in England, Wales and Scotland some are licensed to sell alcohol some are not. Lots of people facing retirement have romantic notions about running a guest house near the seaside, and we are often asked to explain what the legal requirements are.

Firstly you need to understand there are two licensing Acts to consider, one for England & Wales and one for Scotland. Both Acts vary slightly which we will explain in this post.

Gaining a personal licence in England & Wales

In England & Wales to sell alcohol in a guest house you will require a personal alcohol licence. This can be obtained by sitting a one day course on the relevant licensing Act. The licensing qualification is known as the Award for Personal Licence Holders (APLH) level 2 which is an OFQAL regulated qualification generally awarded by awarding bodies such as, the British Institute of Innkeeping (BIIAB). There are several awarding bodies however BII is probably the most well known in the licensed trade. A personal alcohol licence is granted by a local Council’s Licensing Authority, generally this is granted by the Licensing Authority where you reside. Once granted a personal licence is valid forever and can be used anywhere in England & Wales.

Applicants for a licence will also need to prove they have no relevant criminal offences, this is done by providing a basic criminal records check certificate, together with two passport sized photographs and a personal licence application to your local Council’s Licensing Authority.

The premises licence

Many guest houses and bed & breakfasts in England & Wales already hold a premises licence allowing then to sell alcohol under the supervision of a personal licence holder. New owners will need to inform the relevant Council Licensing Authority where the guest house is situated that they are the new licence holder and designated premises supervisor (DPS). This is known as a premises licence transfer and variation of designated premises supervisor. A DPS or designated premises supervisor is the person in day to day control of licensed premises (the licensee).

If a guest house is unlicensed then an application can be made to Council Licensing Authority where the guest house is situated. Most individuals use the services of a licensing consultant for this process. However you can apply yourself to the relevant Council Licensing Authority in the area where the guest house is situated. An application pack with guidance notes can be obtained from the Licensing Authority.

Gaining a personal licence in Scotland

In Scotland to sell alcohol in a guest house you will require a Scottish personal alcohol licence. This can be obtained by sitting a one day course on the Scottish licensing Act. The licensing qualification is known as the Scottish Certificate for Personal Licence Holders (SCPLH) level 6 which is an SQA regulated qualification generally awarded by awarding bodies such as, the British Institute of Innkeeping (BIIAB). There are several awarding bodies however BII (Scotland) is probably the most well known in Scotland. A personal alcohol licence is granted by a local Council’s Licensing Board, generally this is granted by the Licensing Authority where you reside. Once granted a Scottish personal licence is valid for 10 years and can be used anywhere in Scotland. However under Scottish law licence holders must refresh their training every five years.

The Scottish premises licence

Many guest houses in Scotland will already hold a premises licence allowing the sale of alcohol under the supervision of a personal licence holder. New owners will need to inform the relevant Council Licensing Board where the guest house is situated that they are the new licence holder and designated premises manager (DPM). This is known as a premises licence transfer and variation of premises manager. A DPM or designated premises manager is the person in day to day control of licensed premises (the licensee).

Staff training and Scottish law

Any member of staff involved in the retail sale of alcohol in Scotland must under go training on the Scottish Licensing Act. This includes part time or unpaid members of staff. There is a minimal requirement for two hours of basic training covering 16 units from the Act. Records of staff training must be kept at the premises by the premises manager. www.personallicencescotland.com have a useful online staff learning tool that can be used as a training aid for managers.

 

 

Related External Links

Tags: , ,


About the Author

Dean Carr

Dean has been involved in alcohol licensing for over 20 years and has helped many independent retailers and corporate clients obtain a licence to sell alcohol or offer late night refreshment, regulated entertainment from all sorts of premises. Dean writes articles for various trade related blogs and is currently Managing Director of the PLT group of companies who run APLH and SCPLH personal alcohol licence courses nationwide. You can contact Dean or a member of his expert licensing team on: 01242 222 188



Back to Top ↑

Read previous post:
No10
Licence Renewal Update

  On Friday the 27th of March 2015 the Home office confirmed that the renewal of a personal alcohol licence...

Close